Koha Mitts Knitting Pattern

$10.00

These fingerless mitts are worked in the round, starting from the bottom-up. To form the thumb, a small amount of stitches are cast on and grows through a series of increases as the body of the mitt is worked up. Both the left and right mitt follow the same construction, so this makes for a great beginner’s project for a knitter’s first mitt!

Description

Pre-colonization and the advent of money, koha (gift, offering, donation) was the economic lifestyle in Te Ao Māori: a circular economy and redistribution of resources and valuables throughout the community. Nowadays, giving a koha (in the form of money, goods or services) is the practice of bestowing an unconditional gift.

A koha best given is said to mirror the mana of both the giver and the recipient. What the giver is able to give, and the level of appreciation of the recipient.

The Koha Mitts feature a colorwork motif of the Kūmara plant (as identified by the jagged stripes). Someone who is very generous is said to have manaakitanga (hospitality), often demonstrated by the sharing of one’s food or resources with another out of aroha (love, compassion). To respect the mana of yourself and the recipient, this gift is best given to someone who exemplifies the qualities of the Giver Fibre Muse – someone who is selfless and seeks to help others AND is knitworthy!

This Koha can honor their mahi (work) and make them feel loved.

These fingerless mitts are worked in the round, starting from the bottom-up. To form the thumb, a small amount of stitches are cast on and grows through a series of increases as the body of the mitt is worked up. Both the left and right mitt follow the same construction, so this makes for a great beginner’s project for a knitter’s first mitt!

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review “Koha Mitts Knitting Pattern”

Kia ora, I’m Francoise, aka Frenchie. I’m a Franco-Maori, American-Australian living in Osaka, Japan, working as a knitwear designer and design coach.